See here the list of Top 10 best modem router combo. Read the buying guide and other important factors before making a selection for you or any of your dear ones.

Bestseller No. 1
Arris Surfboard (16x4) Docsis 3.0 Cable Modem Plus AC1600 Dual Band Wi-Fi Router, Certified for...
  • 3 products in 1: 16x4 Cable Modem, AC1600 Dual band Wi-Fi Router, 2 Port Gigabit Router
  • APPROVED on Comcast Xfinity, Spectrum (Charter, Time Warner, Bright house Networks), Cox and other US Cable Internet Providers....
  • Cable Modem: 16 DOWNLOAD & 4 UPLOAD channels to maximize your Cable ISP service offerings. APPROVED for plans up to 300 Mbps....
SaleBestseller No. 2
NETGEAR Nighthawk Cable Modem WiFi Router Combo C7000-Compatible with all Cable Providers including...
  • COMPATIBLE WITH ALL MAJOR CABLE INTERNET PROVIDERS: Including certification by Xfinity by Comcast, COX, and Spectrum. Not...
  • SAVE MONTHLY RENTAL FEES: Model C7000 replaces your cable modem and WiFi router saving you up to $150/yr in equipment rental fees....
  • BUILT FOR FAST SPEED: Best for cable provider plans up to 400 Mbps speed
SaleBestseller No. 3
MOTOROLA MG7550 16x4 Cable Modem Plus AC1900 Dual Band WiFi Gigabit Router with Power Boost and DFS,...
  • 16x4 DOCSIS 3.0 cable modem plus a built-in AC1900 Dual Band (2.4 GHz and 5 GHz) WiFi Gigabit Router with four Gigabit (GigE)...
  • Requires cable Internet service. Approved by and for use with Comcast Xfinity and Xfinity X1, Cox, Charter Spectrum, Time Warner...
  • Built-in high-speed WiFi router with AC1900 WiFi, and Power Boost, and DFS provides Internet access for WiFi devices including...
Bestseller No. 4
Motorola MG7700 24x8 Cable Modem Plus AC1900 Dual Band WiFi Gigabit Router with Power Boost, 1000...
  • Fast 24x8 DOCSIS 3.0 cable Modem Plus a built-in AC1900 Dual band (2.4GHz and 5GHz) Wi-Fi Gigabit Router with four Gigabit (GigE)...
  • Eliminate up to $156 per year in cable Modem rental fees. (Savings are shown for Comcast Xfinity and vary by cable service...
  • Built-in high-speed router with AC1900 wireless and Power boost - Provides internet access for Wi-Fi devices including...
SaleBestseller No. 5
NETGEAR Cable Modem CM500 - Compatible with all Cable Providers including Xfinity by Comcast,...
  • COMPATIBLE WITH ALL MAJOR CABLE INTERNET PROVIDERS: Including certification by Xfinity by Comcast, COX, and Spectrum. NOT...
  • SAVE MONTHLY RENTAL FEES: Model CM500 replaces your cable modem saving you up to $150/yr in equipment rental fees
  • BUILT FOR FAST SPEED: Best for cable provider plans up to 300 Mbps speed.System Requirements Microsoft Windows 7, 8, 10, Vista,...
SaleBestseller No. 6
NETGEAR Nighthawk AC1900 (24x8) DOCSIS 3.0 WiFi Cable Modem Router Combo (C7000) for Xfinity from...
  • Compatible with Xfinity from Comcast, Spectrum, Cox, CableONE & more. Not compatible with Cable bundled voice services
  • Three-in-one DOCSIS 3.0 Cable Modem + AC1900 WiFi Router+ 4 Gigabit Wired Switch
  • Up to 960Mbps modem speed and Dual-Band AC1900 (2.4GHz & 5GHz) WiFi speed. 24x8 channel bonding/ Approved for plans up to 500...
Bestseller No. 7
NETGEAR Nighthawk AC1900 (24x8) DOCSIS 3.0 WiFi Cable Modem Router Combo for Xfinity from Comcast,...
  • Compatible with Xfinity from Comcast, Spectrum, Cox, CableONE & more. Not compatible with Cable bundled voice services;Dimensions:...
  • Up to 960Mbps modem speed and Dual-Band AC1900 (2.4GHz & 5GHz) WiFi speed. 24x8 channel bonding/ Approved for plans up to 500 Mbps...
  • Ideal for streaming 4K HD videos, faster downloads, and high-speed online gaming.WiFi Technology:802.11ac Dual Band Gigabit
Bestseller No. 8
MOTOROLA MG7315 8x4 Cable Modem Plus N450 Single Band Wi-Fi Gigabit Router with Power Boost, 343...
  • 8x4 DOCSIS 3.0 cable Modem Plus a built-in N450 single band (2.4 GHz) Wi-Fi Gigabit Router with four Gigabit (GigE) Ethernet...
  • Requires cable internet service. Approved by and for use with Comcast Affinity and Xfinity x1, Cox, Charter spectrum, time Warner...
  • Built-in high-speed Wi-Fi router with N450 Wi-Fi and Power boost provides internet access for Wi-Fi devices including smartphones,...
Bestseller No. 9
Netgear C6250-100NAS AC1600 (16x4) WiFi Cable Modem Router Combo (C6250) DOCSIS 3.0 Certified for...
  • Compatible with Xfinity from Comcast, Spectrum, Cox, CableONE & more
  • Three-in-one DOCSIS 3.0 Cable Modem + AC1600 WiFi Router+ 2 Gigabit Wired Switch
  • Up to 680Mbps modem speed and Dual-Band AC1600 (2.4GHz & 5GHz) WiFi speed. 16x4 channel bonding/ Approved for plans up to 300...
Bestseller No. 10
MOTOROLA MG7540 16x4 Cable Modem Plus AC1600 Dual Band Wi-Fi Gigabit Router with DFS, 686 Mbps...
  • 16x4 DOCSIS 3.0 cable modem plus a built-in AC1600 Dual Band (2.4 GHz and 5 GHz) WiFi Gigabit Router with four Gigabit (GigE)...
  • Requires cable Internet service. Approved by Comcast Xfinity and Xfinity X1, Cox, Charter Spectrum, BrightHouse, WOW!, CableOne,...
  • Built-in high-speed WiFi router with AC1600 Wi-Fi provides Internet access for WiFi devices including smartphones, notebooks,...

Using the router and the modem/router combination of the ISP in tandem

If you run your own router next to the modem/router combination of your Internet service provider, there is a good chance that you will unintentionally have a headache and a lot of hard-to-find network problems. Let’s look at why these problems are emerging, how they are detected, and how they can be resolved.

Why is the router doubling? Doubles the headache

The worst tech issues are the ones that are hard to pin down. For example, getting a new cable modem from your ISP that just does not work is an easy fix. But what if you see small but annoying problems over several weeks? It is becoming increasingly difficult to pinpoint exactly what’s wrong with your network (or what’s causing it). Running two routers on your home network at the same time is exactly the situation where these phantom problems can occur. Before we know exactly why this can lead to such a headache, let’s look at how you might get into this situation without realizing it.

The most common situation is this: your ISP provides you with a modem, which is actually a combination of modem and router, and you then add your own router. Now your Internet traffic will pass through your new router and the router provided by the ISP. While this is the most common version of this issue, it can happen if you use two routers in succession. You may be using an older replacement router as a switch for some additional Ethernet ports or as an additional wireless LAN access point without properly configuring it.

In all of these cases, you are in a situation where a particular communication on your home network can (or even has to) pass through two routers. Running through two network devices is not automatically bad. However, if a Network Address Translation (NAT) service is running on both devices, you will end up in a network connection called “Double NAT.”

The NAT service on your router is a very handy thing. In short, the service takes all incoming requests to your only public IP address and intelligently translates them into the internal private IP addresses of your computers and devices. However, if there are two, things get messy as all these network requirements are forced to go through two translation events.

At best, this leads to latencies in your network connections, which can cause delays in latency-sensitive applications such as games. In the worst case, it completely ruins UPnP (Universal Plug and Play) and any other router-based service, assuming that the router is always directed towards the larger Internet (rather than another internal network). UPnP, the most common victim of double NAT, is a convenient router service that automatically forwards ports on your router so that applications that require specific or forwarded ports work properly.

How to Identify a Double NAT?

Network Address Translation (NAT) is a ubiquitous feature in modern routers. If you simply connect a router to another router, it’s practically a fact that you accidentally created a duplicate NAT. Nevertheless, it is convenient to test whether you are behind a dual NAT or not, if this is not facilitated for any other reason than confirming the problem solution. The simplest test you can do is check your router’s Wide Area Network (WAN) IP address. This is the IP address of the router believes the outside world to be and can be referred to as “WAN IP,” “Internet IP,” “Internet Address,” or “Public Address,” depending on the router.

Log into the Control Panel of each router on your home network. For example, if you purchased a router and if you use a router provided by your ISP, you should connect to them and check what they report as their WAN IP addresses. Here is an example of our D-Link router with DD-WRT firmware, what you are looking for.

In the screenshot above you can see that the “WAN IP” of the router is 97. *. *. * Is marked. This is excellent because our public IP address is an IP address that belongs to our ISP. What we refuse Here you will see an IP address such as 192.168.0.1, 10.0.0.1 or 172.16.0.1 or slight deviations from it, as these address blocks are reserved for private networks. If the WAN IP address of your router is within these address blocks This means that your router does not connect directly to the Internet, but connects to another routing hardware.

How to fix a Double NAT?

There are several ways to fix a double NAT problem and, fortunately, they are all quite easy to use. We’re happy to provide specific instructions for your exact situation, but there are just too many routers, too many firmware versions, and too many possible combinations, so we may be able to give you the exact combination of steps for your hardware. However, if you combine our tutorials with one or more Google searches related to your specific hardware and firmware, we are sure that you have solved the problem in no time. If the confusion with network hardware is new territory for you, you should read our direct guide to routers, switches, and network terminology before proceeding.

Remove the additional hardware

This is by far the easiest solution. In a scenario where there actually is redundant hardware, it is easiest to remove them. For example, suppose you (or the relative whose connection you can not properly investigate) have bought a nice new router and immediately plugged it into the old router. Instead of dealing with the logistics and energy waste of running two routers, you can simply remove the old router to banish duplicate NAT.

Switch your primary (ISP) router into bridge mode

If your problem is that you have an ISP-provided router/modem combo (plus your own router), the best solution is to put the router provided by the ISP into “bridge mode”. Bridging is simply an old network technology that transparently connects two different networks. If you switch to bridge mode, you are instructing the modem/router combination to act essentially as a modem, ie to disable all routing functions.

While this is an excellent way to solve the dual NAT problem, there is one thing to keep in mind: All devices except the router that were previously connected to your ISP-provided router/modem must be on your current device be moved routers. If you have a computer connected directly to the ISP’s Ethernet port, for example, if you switch to bridging mode, you will need to connect it to your personal router instead. If the device provided by the ISP has a Wi-Fi access point to which some of your devices are connected (such as your iPad), that access point will stop working and you will need to upgrade all your Wi-Fi devices to your personal router,

Try to google the “bridge mode” along with the model number of your ISP router. You may find instructions for enabling bridge mode. However, sometimes you need to contact your Internet service provider directly to put your ISP-provided router into bridge mode. The screenshot below shows an example of selecting Router Mode and Bridge Mode, as displayed in the Cisco Control Panel in dozens of different generic router/modem combi units.

Although it is bridge mode, you can technically switch the router behind your ISP router as a bridge, but we do not recommend this for two reasons. First, the routers purchased by customers are almost always of higher quality than the routers provided by the ISP. So you’d better use your own router than the router they offer you. Second, although you can stupefy a router to a point where it’s just a network switch, using a good router is a waste. (Unless of course you already had it lying around and need some extra connections.)

Insert your secondary router into the DMZ

This is a less common and less ideal, but quite practical solution: You can use your router in the DMZ of the ISP router. Most routers have the option of placing a device in the DMZ (also called a demilitarized zone), with all of this device’s traffic being simply forwarded to the larger Internet (and vice versa). If the router provided by the ISP does not provide bridging mode but a DMZ option, this may be your only solution. Browse through the settings of your router provided by the ISP and enter the IP address of your personal router in the DMZ list (reference documentation for your specific model if that function can not be found).

If you use the Cisco control panel, which is used in many of the ISP-supplied combo units, the DMZ user interface looks like this:

Setting up a computer or other device in the DMZ is usually not advisable (because the device is exposed to the Internet). However, setting up a router in the DMZ is perfectly fine (since the router wanted to establish a direct connection to the computer Internet anyway). The only problems that you can encounter with this solution are if you do not remove all devices from the ISP router and put them on your personal router, as the network of the ISP router and the network of your router work completely independently of each other.

This means that if your laser printer is connected to your ISP-provided router and you try to print from your laptop to your personal router, the two devices just will not see each other. There is a very good chance if you have a serious network problem and you are running two routers on the same network where the setup of the two router is at fault. With a little bit of troubleshooting and a quick change of settings on one of the routers, you can painlessly distribute your headache associated with the connection.